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Do You Do DIY Letterhead?

Deborah SavadraDeborah Savadra Gulf Coast, Alabama, USA
edited January 11 in Legal Technology

How many attorneys here print their letterhead on their inkjet/laser printer rather than have letterhead printed by a professional printer (offset, etc.)?

If so, what issues have you run into re: formatting, etc.? What features would you want your DIY letterhead to have, in a perfect world?

Post edited by samglover on
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Comments

  • samgloversamglover Minneapolis, MN Admin

    And if you do have your own letterhead in Word format, please share it with us! You can use the "Attach a file" link when replying to upload your template.

  • thedanshermanthedansherman Maple Plain, MN

    We print our own on our color laser printer, similar to this sample from Typography for Lawyers. Most of the time though, we are just emailing PDFs instead of sending printed letters.

    We haven't really had any problems with formatting. I have the template portion set up as a text box anchored in the header with a wide left margin so that no one "accidentally" messes with the formatting. I also wrote a macro to change the attorney's name and email address to make it easy for our secretary to personalize for anyone who might send a letter. This way all she has to worry about is the text of the letter, since all the formatting is in place.

  • I think printed letterhead would be a waste of money these days. 90% of letters I write are faxed or emailed anyway. There really is no social stigma anymore attached to laser printer letterhead.

  • samgloversamglover Minneapolis, MN Admin

    I don't think Deborah meant print as in printing paper copies. I think she meant it as encompassing converting to PDF, which is what most of us do, most of the time.

    I don't even email letterhead. If I want to communicate by email, I just do that. I don't see the point in attaching a communication to a communication, just so I can use my fancy-looking letterhead.

  • thedanshermanthedansherman Maple Plain, MN

    I don't even email letterhead. If I want to communicate by email, I just do that. I don't see the point in attaching a communication to a communication, just so I can use my fancy-looking letterhead.

    But our letterhead is so fancy! See how professional we are?

    Actually, we only use it for quote & fee agreement letters, or official communications with government bodies.

  • I'm attaching two of our letterhead files—one in Word format, and the other as PDF, because we don't use system fonts, they probably wont display properly unless you have our font installed. Re formatting, we rarely, if ever have problems, because we do it similar to thedansherman.

  • mkolbermkolber North Carolina

    I don't even email letterhead. If I want to communicate by email, I just do that. I don't see the point in attaching a communication to a communication, just so I can use my fancy-looking letterhead.

    I do. On occasion. The downside to email is the same thing that leads to the often discussed problem of being less careful in what one says — its informality. I use email as email extensively but for certain things, such as a legal opinion to a client, I want things to look formal. Having dealt with institutional clients, so do they. Letterhead, in pdf, fill that need.

  • Like thedansherman, my letterhead is based on a sample from Typography for Lawyers. I've attached the MS Word doc (done w/ MS Word for Mac 2011) and a PDF.

  • Letterhead attached. I have it set up as an autotext so I can just add it into a Word document. I then convert my Word doc to PDF using Acrobat. I don't use a letterhead for email, just a signature.

  • Jeff HurdJeff Hurd Rapid City, SD

    We have our letterhead printed. But so much of my correspondence is by email, that I created the attached template for email correspondence.

  • Wow. After seeing some of these, I am seriously considering 1) changing my letterhead and 2) buying Typography for Lawyers.

  • samgloversamglover Minneapolis, MN Admin

    You should definitely buy Typography for Lawyers. It's so nerdy. Do it now, before typography becomes passe (it's already close).

  • My biggest annoyance with Word letterhead templates was that if you put the letterhead in the Header in Word, you have to chose different first page which means that page numbering has to be specifically chosen on both the first page and the second. Too many key strokes.

    I avoid that by putting my letterhead into a Cover Page on the Word Ribbon. A bonus is getting right to work on the Letterhead document after a single key stroke.

  • js@jasonskeltonlaw.comjs@jasonskeltonlaw.com Portland, Oregon USA

    The side header is an interesting idea.

    Mine is simple and shares the same fonts with my business card. I intentionally put my telephone first and in larger font because I get frustrated when I cannot find a firm's tel number on their letterhead. For correspondence sent to clients or other important persons I use nice stock paper with an orange stripe down the side that mimics my business cards.

  • thedanshermanthedansherman Maple Plain, MN

    before typography becomes passe (it's already close)

    Flashy things like iOS7 might (become passe), but most of the stuff in TFL will still be valid in 20 years.

  • samgloversamglover Minneapolis, MN Admin

    I suppose that's true. I spend more thinking about web design, these days, and the obsession with typography has become ridiculous. Meanwhile, Apple gets credit for adopting Helvetica, which you might call the world's most-common typeface. It's a good one, but it's hardly advanced typography.

  • mkolbermkolber North Carolina

    @PaulWigg_Maxwell said:
    My biggest annoyance with Word letterhead templates was that if you put the letterhead in the Header in Word, you have to chose different first page which means that page numbering has to be specifically chosen on both the first page and the second. Too many key strokes.

    Why? Create the template with two pages and do the "different first page" there. Then delete the 2nd page. The code will remain and get used any time you go to multiple pages.

    Here's my sample, which does exactly that. Just add a page break {Ctrl-Enter} or toss in some text to force a new page and you will see what I mean.

  • Never considered purchasing LH from a printer. Too expensive and I don't use the mail enough to justify. I haven't had any problems with formatting, although at some point I do want to go back and redo mine.

    Here's mine. Seems a little more low key than most of these. Gets the job done. Wanted to use Baskerville but chose Constantia for some reason that I can't remember now. Franklin Gothic for body type because its awesome (mostly b/c I like the way the lower case 'g' looks).

    TWS

  • Alright, attached are my old letterhead and my new one, as I'm really liking the side-thing you guys are doing.

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